About Dean Klinkenberg

Dean Klinkenberg, the Mississippi Valley Traveler, is on a mission to explore the rich history, diverse cultures, and varied ecosystems of the Mississippi River Valley, from the Headwaters in northern Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico. He is the author of Rock Island Lines, a mystery, and several guidebooks for the Mississippi Valley.

Remembering Bill Marshall

Bill Marshall was a generous and gracious man. We sat down for an interview in 2011.

By | July 25th, 2016|Blogging the Great River Road|2 Comments

Recycling Hope

It feels like the world has been full of nothing but bad news lately, but, as often happens around the Mississippi, just wait a bit and something will come along to lift your spirits. That was the case this week, when a crew of six explorers/activists floated into Alton on some trash from New York.

By | July 16th, 2016|Blogging the Great River Road|0 Comments

Life Where the Mississippi River Begins

The first time I visited Itasca State Park, where the Mississippi spills gently out of Lake Itasca, the park was covered in a foot-and-a-half of snow and most of the lake was frozen. It was late January, and I wanted to get an idea of what the place was like in winter. I wasn’t disappointed.

By | July 13th, 2016|About the Mississippi Valley|0 Comments

Swinging over the Locks: The Quad Cities’ Government Bridge

Even at 120 years old, the Government Bridge is an impressive feat of engineering.

By | June 12th, 2016|About the Mississippi Valley|0 Comments

Ten River Festivals to Liven Up Your Summer

If your budget is tight this year and your dream trip to Venice is on hold, now is a great time to hit the road to get reacquainted with the history and culture of the Mississippi Valley. And what could be more fun than visiting festivals along the river that mix history and culture with

By | May 22nd, 2016|Travel articles|0 Comments

Enduring Benefits of the CCC and WPA

In 1932, the US Gross National Product dropped a record 13% and nearly one-quarter of the adult population was unemployed; in three years 40% of American banks had failed. In the first few weeks after his inauguration in March 1933, President Franklin Roosevelt launched a series of ambitious public works programs to get people working

By | April 9th, 2016|About the Mississippi Valley|0 Comments