Fort Madison

Population (2010) 11,051 History In 1805, General James Wilkinson, Governor of the new Louisiana Territory and commander of the western army, chose Zebulon Pike to lead an expedition to explore the upper Mississippi. A major focus of Pike’s trip was to locate the headwaters of the Mississippi River (he failed), but he was also asked

By | 2017-07-02T15:59:14+00:00 November 21st, 2014|Iowa|0 Comments

Burlington

Population (2010) 25,663 Introduction Burlington was built on a bowl-shaped depression at the end of a ravine that opens up at the Mississippi. As the city grew, folks built up, over, and around the hills, expanding into the prairies that spread out from the bluffs. Visitors will find most of the attractions concentrated in the flatlands and

By | 2017-07-01T22:04:02+00:00 November 17th, 2014|Iowa|0 Comments

Muscatine

Population (2010) 22,886 Introduction After 43 miles of flowing from east to west, the Mississippi takes a sharp turn at Muscatine and resumes its mostly southward trek to the Gulf of Mexico. Muscatine was a busy industrial town for decades and still has its share of manufacturing, but many residents today commute to work in

By | 2016-10-21T15:28:13+00:00 November 9th, 2014|Iowa|2 Comments

Potosi

Population (2010) 688 Introduction The sign welcoming you to Potosi says “World’s Longest Main Street.” Maybe I’m over-thinking this, but I haven’t been able to figure out what this claim actually means. Robert Ripley (Ripley’s Believe It or Not) once said that Potosi “was the smallest town with the longest street without an intersection.” (I

By | 2017-08-06T11:52:14+00:00 October 17th, 2009|Wisconsin|5 Comments

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